Back in Stock!

In-Line Sharpening System

 

I’m happy to announce that at long last I have the In-Line Swivel Knife Sharpening Hand Pieces back in stock.  They are once again available to purchase here in the store on this site.  https://redoxbrand.sagecreeksaddles.com/product/handpiece/

My thanks to those who have inquired and patiently awaited this announcement.  Those of you that have questions about this swivel knife sharpening system are encouraged to contact me by email.  If you encounter any difficulties in ordering, please email or text me at 307-272-8585.  I’ll get right back to you.

Gordon Andrus  

New Flame Colored Stainless Steel Swivel Knives

How to order

I’m making these new knives personally one at a time.  They will be made to order with sizing specifics determined by you the customer.  They are flame-colored stainless steel. The knurling has the best grip of any knives I’ve ever used, especially the ones with the annular rings. The yoke has two bearings for stability and is very smooth. My blades are made of D2 blade steel. For the time being, I am selling these with a blade at the same price ($160.00, $10.00 shipping included) as my regular knives as found here on my Red Ox Brand website.  These new knives differ from those in the shop here.  To order one I just need an email address, shipping address, and phone number, to send an invoice That you will be able to securely pay online.

Please specify the barrel length and diameter that you would like for your knife. The three in these pictures are 7/16″. Other choices are, 3/8″, 1/2″, 9/16″, and 5/8″.

To determine the length of the barrel that you want, study the picture to the right.  You need to measure your current knife from the yoke saddle to the end of the barrel without a blade.  Then, decide how much adjustment you want the new knife to have beyond the top end of the barrel.  The knife can be made with the barrel top right below the yoke, or you can choose to have some adjustment room to set it shorter if needed.  All knives are able to be set longer than the chosen barrel length.

To order a knife I specifically need the barrel length that you decide upon and the barrel diameter.

The picture at the far right illustrates a method that has proven particularly good for determining a swivel knife’s length based on hand size.  It might be a good idea to try this with a knife that you currently use before measuring for your new knife.

I’m very excited about these unique knives and appreciate the opportunity to make them available to you.
Gordon

Knife length

From my book “Harmony and Life in Leather

“Understand the swivel knife and the ergo­nomics of its use.”

The knife, in the picture to the right, has been adjusted using the above method of finding the length from your hand size.  It may be longer than many folks are accustomed to. Also, note that the fingers and side of the hand are up, off of the work surface, as are the forearm and elbow, freeing up the joints of the arm to move. The length of the knife is such that a natural stress is set up, in the index finger, which automatically pushes the knife downward into the leather. If you have always adjusted your knife to be shorter than this, you may think that this feels awkward. In fact, people who make this adjustment gain a great deal more control. With your hand and arm free of the bench top, you are free to move all of the linkages in your arm, to make long, flowing cuts that taper over their entire length.

Oooops Fixed

I should have done this months ago…

The problems in the first small printing of this book, “Harmony and Life in Leather”, have been fixed.  The errors were changed right away and other than the first  twenty or so books they have been going out with no missing images or text ever since.  The books are available here.  They can also be purchased from the Leather Crafters and Saddlers Journal, and will soon be available from Barry King at his website.

Harmony and Life cover 2 Altrnt

Drawing the Basic Acanthus Leaf

This post is excerpted from my book, “Drawing Floral Patterns For Leather Tooling”

The following drawings illustrate
the skeletal lines within the various
shapes that we draw, starting with the
most basic leaf and progressing to complex
structures like acanthus leaves, scrolls,
and flowers.
The simple leaf in the drawing here
shows how the leaf tapers to blend into
the skeleton. This is the way that skeletal
lines work in a nicely flowing layout.
They are in the center of the various structures
in the drawing and keep things moving
smoothly.Skeletal-Leaf-development-pg-1
In the next, more complex leaf there
are two skeletal lines, and in the next leaf
there are three. The third line descends
from the lobe that is formed by the S curve
at the top. Knowing that the skeletal line
is there, where the swelling of this lobe is
at its fullest, we are able to keep things
balanced.
As will be seen in the layouts presented
later, most of these lines don’t get
drawn in when drawing a layout pattern.
However it is important to know that they
are there. These lines form the composition
beneath the big picture.

For the purpose of this blog post I want to make a suggestion that you get a tracing pad, print out these images and trace the lines.  -But-  When doing this I suggest that you concentrate on the dimensions of each part relative to the other parts.  Try tracing the little thumb, or simple leaf and then turn the tracing to see how many times its length will go into the the S curve at the top of the combined leaf.  Concentrate on the size and sweep of the curves in the S curve.  The curve at the tip is smaller than the curve that connects the thumb leaf.  While tracing look to see how each line relates to the skeletal lines.

The point is, it is not enough to make the right number of bumps, curves and tapers.  Each part needs to be in the right proportion to every other part.

It is perfectly acceptable to trace like this for the purpose of learning how it feels to draw certain shapes.  If you practice enough you will develop muscle memory for the shapes.  If you don’t gain muscle memory you simply won’t be able to draw floral designs.  So develop the discipline to practice when you are not trying to work on an actual project.

When you can draw the basic shapes that you want to use in your patterns, then you will be ready to take on the much more complex task of putting them together in a layout.

Leaf-development-post

Greater Dimension in Leather Tooling — Use of the Back Beveler Stamp

Why Take Less Time When You Can Take More

Why indeed?  This is a constant question that, I know, I face constantly when at work in my shop.  I'm trying to balance efficiency with vision.  It's easy to see where more could be done, so how do I decide when enough is enough?  This is a subject that I would like to engage in depth here.  For today however, I need to get back into the shop and continue work on an important deadline...

That's the dilemma.  Though I tend to come down these days more and more on the side of taking more time, the result of which is that I always have less time to do everything.  Glib I know, but that's all I have time for because I want to share this little video about a tool that I started making and using a few years ago.  The tool is not a common one, though it certainly is becoming more common all the time.  It is the Back Beveler.  The picture here shows the depth and sculptural effect that it has on the work, and this short video shows how I use it.

Please enjoy this clip, and please leave questions or comments.

 

Gordon